Math as Entertainment

For this assignment you are going to collect four or more games and/or puzzles that you could use as a teacher to help teach math concepts or to re-enforce previously learned concepts. For each game or puzzle you will be required to submit the following:

ï Name of the game/puzzle
ï Any rules or regulations required to carry out the game/puzzle
ï An example of one finished or in process
ï The mathematical principle or foundation addressed
ï A description of how the game/puzzle assists the students in learning the above principle or foundation
ï A description of how the game/puzzle may address different learning styles/intelligences (i.e. differentiated instruction)
ï A description of an assessment plan showing how you may use the game/puzzle as a way of better understanding your students learning process

You may come up with another idea that addresses the concept of Math as Entertainment (e.g. sports). If so, you are free to use your own idea as long as it fits the requirements lined out in the attached rubric for this exercise. If it does not seem to fit but you still wish to use it please contact me so we can discuss its potential.

Also, please not that on the rubric there is a space for your own self-evaluation (worth approximately 10% of the assignment). Please give yourself the grade and explain what aspect of your project outside of anything that I have included is worthy of the mark. As long as it is reasonable I will give you those marks


Submit this assignment as an attachment through email. If materials that cannot be sent via email are required to make sense of the game please include either a photograph of required material or a written description of said materials. If this is not possible for some reason contact me directly for a dialogue about this situation.
Rubric for “Math as Entertainment” Assignment


0
1
2
3
Total
Number of games/puzzles
Only one given.
Only two given.
Only three given.
Four or more given.

Connection to mathematics
No clear connection to any mathematics.
Math is present but not an inherent property of the game or puzzle given.
Some puzzles/games show the inherent property of math but not all.
All puzzles/games show an inherent property of mathematics.

Quality of mathematical connection
Does not engage the mathematical concept desired.
Engages the desired math concept poorly and/or inaccurately.
Some examples engage the desired mathematical concept well.
All examples engage the desired mathematical concept well.

Accessibility of games/puzzles
Puzzles/games beyond the expected comprehension of target grade.

Some of the puzzles/games within the expected comprehension of target grade.
All of the puzzles/games within the expected comprehension of target grade.

Student engagement
Puzzles/games chosen would not be engaging for target grade.

Some of the puzzles/games expected to be engaging for the target grade.
All of the puzzles/games expected to be engaging for the target grade.

Learning benefits of games/puzzles
No real learning benefit for target grade
Potential learning benefits present but not essential to the puzzle/game.
Potential learning benefits are essential to the partaking of the puzzle/game.
Nature of the puzzle/game allows not only skill-building but also provides opportunity for students to create their own learning experiences.

Differentiated instruction
No attempt made at addressing different learning styles or levels.
Attempts made at differentiation but largely ineffective.
Effective differentiation built into some of the games/puzzles.
Effective differentiation built into all of the games/puzzles.
<or>
A convincing argument that games/puzzles not differentiate because it is not possible to differentiate them.

Assessment plan
No assessment plan included
Assessment plan included but only evaluative
Formative assessment plans included for some of the games/puzzles.
Formative assessment plans included for all of the games/puzzles.

Your own evaluation of your assignment



<please describe>






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